Saturday, December 10, 2016

Inspectah Deck

wu-tang-member-inspectah-deckJason Hunter, (born July 6, 1970) better known by his stage name Inspectah Deck, is an American rapper, producer, and member of the Wu-Tang Clan. Although he has not gained the same level of mainstream success in his solo career as some of his Wu-Tang counterparts like Method Man, he has acquired critical praise for his intricate lyricism, and for his verses on many of the group’s most revered songs. He has growingly become a producer in his own right, taking up tracks for fellow clansmen and his own projects. Born July 6, 1970, Hunter routinely mentions the Park Hill Projects in Clifton, Staten Island, where he grew up, going to school with the future Method Man, Raekwon, and Ghostface Killah.

Coming from a musical family, his father died when he was six years old, and seeing his mother support the family contributed to his laid-back, quiet mentality; this led to his stage name, as he decided to play a low-key counterbalance to the antics of Method Man, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, and RZA. This is also referenced by Method Man at the end of the track “Can it Be All So Simple?” on Wu-Tang’s debut album Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) : “Inspectah Deck, he’s like that dude that’ll sit back and watch you play yourself and all that right? And see you sit there and know you lyin; and he’ll take you to court after that, cuz he the Inspectah.” Despite this inconspicuous persona, Inspectah Deck maintained a relatively high profile, as he was the second most featured member on the album, and provided highly acclaimed verses for the singles “C.R.E.A.M.,” “Protect Ya Neck,” “Wu-Tang Clan Ain’t Nuthing ta Fuck Wit,” and “Da Mystery of Chessboxin’.”

In the years following, Hunter would appear on several Wu members’ solo projects, including Method Man’s Tical (1994), Raekwon’s Only Built 4 Cuban Linx… (1995), GZA’s Liquid Swords (1995), and Ghostface Killah’s Ironman (1996). On Wu-Tang’s second group album, Wu-Tang Forever (1997), Deck produced the track “Visionz” and contributed a solo track, “The City”, as well as writing one of the most critically acclaimed verses in hip-hop on the group’s hit single “Triumph”. He would also provide production for some of his Wu cohorts, including “Elements” and “Spazzola” for Method Man’s Tical 2000: Judgement Day (1998), “Kiss of a Black Widow” for RZA’s RZA as Bobby Digital in Stereo (1998), and the title track for GZA’s Beneath the Surface (1999).